We Believe

What we believe is simply expressed in the Three Ecumenical Creeds, namely, the Apostles’ Creed, the Nicene Creed, and the Athanasian Creed.

These statements of faith were formulated and inspired in the face of heresies in the early Church and in meeting the need to separate orthodoxy from subtle falsehoods concerning, firstly, the personhood of Jesus Christ and then that of the Holy Spirit.

The Apostles’ Creed reads as follows:

I believe in God, the Father Almighty,
creator of heaven and earth.

I believe in Jesus Christ,
His only Son our Lord.
He was conceived by the
power of the Holy Spirit
and born of the virgin Mary.
He suffered under Pontius Pilate,
was crucified, died and was buried.
He descended into hell.
On the third day He rose again.
He ascended into heaven,
and is seated at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again to judge
the living and the dead.

I believe in the Holy Spirit,
the holy catholic* Church,
the communion of saints,
the forgiveness of sins,
the resurrection of the body,
and the life + everlasting. Amen.

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The Athanasian Creed

Early in the fourth century, a new teaching appeared which claimed that Jesus was not true God. Arius, the north African priest who first proposed this theory, was extremely persuasive, and soon the controversy was so widespread that a church council was called to settle the matter. Out of that meeting in A.D. 325 came the Nicene Creed, which clearly confesses Jesus to be true God.
That creed, which was expanded in A.D. 381 in order to defend the divinity of the Holy Spirit, is still widely used today as a confession of the triune faith. Despite the clarity of the Nicene Creed, the controversy continued for some time. Toward the end of the fifth century, another creed was written that marveled at the mystery of the Trinity in a way that no creed had ever done. Though attributed to Athanasius, a fourth-century opponent of Arius, this anonymous creed clearly came at a later stage in the debate.
The Athanasian Creed proclaims that its teachings concerning the Holy Trinity and our Lord’s incarnation are the catholic faith. In other words, this is what the true church of all times and all places has confessed. More than 15 centuries later, the church continues to confess this truth, confident that the triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, has given himself for our salvation.

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Click Here to read the Athanasian Creed

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The Nicene Creed reads as follows:

We believe in one God,
the Father, the Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth,
of all that is, seen and unseen.

We believe in one Lord, Jesus Christ,
the only Son of God,
eternally begotten of the Father,
God from God, Light from Light,
true God from true God, begotten, not made,
of one being with the Father.
Through Him all things were made.
For us and for our salvation
He came down from heaven;
by the power of the Holy Spirit
he became incarnate from the
virgin Mary and was made man.
For our sake He was crucified
under Pontius Pilate;
He suffered death and was buried.
On the third day he rose again
in accordance with the Scriptures;
He ascended into heaven and is seated
at the right hand of the Father.
He will come again in glory to judge
the living and the dead,
and His kingdom will have no end.

We believe in the Holy Spirit,
the Lord, the giver of life,
who proceeds from the Father and the Son.
With the Father and the Son
He is worshiped and glorified.
He has spoken through the prophets.
We believe in one holy catholic*
and apostolic Church.
We acknowledge one Baptism
for the 
forgiveness of sins.
We look for the resurrection of the dead
and the life + of the world to come. Amen

* the word “catholic” means universal, and speaks of all Christian churches throughout the world.